Learn the Causes and Effects of Ebola in Research Abstract Co-Authored by Deborah S. Parris, Ph.D.

Deborah ParrisOver the past four decades, Dr. Deborah S. Parris has distinguished herself as an authoritative figure in the fields of molecular virology and viral oncology. With her combined expertise in the fields of infectious diseases and cancer, Dr. Parris is prepared to provide expert scientific background and advice to pharmaceutical corporations, grant agencies, investment entities, and related corporations interested in the future of anti-infective and anti-cancer therapies.

The recent Ebola scare has driven people across the United States into a panic. However, Dr. Parris has already made a name for herself in the areas of molecular virology, immunology and medical genetics, having written a large number of peer-reviewed scientific publications. She is also a skilled grant writer and peer-reviewer. Dr. Parris has been a member of the faculty and Comprehensive Cancer Center at The Ohio State University for more than three decades, and she is now a professor in the Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics at the College of Medicine. The research that is currently being conducted in her laboratory focuses on the suppression of RNA silencing by the Ebola virus. Dr. Parris’ contributions to the fields of herpes virus research and DNA replication fidelity are recognized nationally and internationally. Her research has been consistently funded by the National Institutes of Health and nonprofit agencies, such as the American Cancer Society.

Deborah S. Parris, Ph.D. conducts groundbreaking research on the Ebola virusIn 2006, she was elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of “Science” magazine. She has received numerous other awards including a Fogarty Senior International Fellowship, a Wellcome International Travel Fellowship, the Excellence in Research and Teaching award at the OSU College of Medicine, the James Champion Award for distinguished service to the OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Sanford Goldston Memorial Research Award.

Read a research abstract co-authored by Dr. Parris in the “Journal of Virology” titled ‘Characterization of the RNA Silencing Suppression Activity of the Ebola Virus VP35 Protein in Plants and Mammalian Cells.’ Click here to read more research conducted by Dr. Parris.

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Educator Raymond Volkas Tells New Scientist Magazine of Breakthroughs with Renowned Higgs Boson Particle in Superconductors

Raymond VolkasProfessor Raymond Volkas, Head of School of the University of Melbourne, made recent observations about the Higgs boson, or what has become known by many as the “God particle.” The atom, which has been speculated to be the very unit that is solely responsible for all the mass in the universe, was revealed to have a ‘cousin’ last month, and Professor Volkas made headway on the correlations and likenesses between the former and the latter.

From newscientist.com:

A weird theoretical cousin of the Higgs boson, one that inspired the decades-long hunt for the elusive particle, has been properly observed for the first time. The discovery bookends one of the most exciting eras in modern physics.

The Higgs field, which gives rise to its namesake boson, is credited with giving other particles mass by slowing their movement through the vacuum of space. First proposed in the 1960s, the particle finally appeared at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN near Geneva, Switzerland, in 2012, and some of the theorists behind it received the 2013 Nobel prize in physics.

But the idea was actually borrowed from the behaviour of photons in superconductors, metals that, when cooled to very low temperatures, allow electrons to move without resistance.

Near zero degrees kelvin, vibrations are set up in the superconducting material that slow down pairs of photons travelling through, making light act as though it has a mass.

This effect is closely linked to the idea of the Higgs – “the mother of it actually,” says Raymond Volkas at the University of Melbourne in Australia.

Those vibrations are the mathematical equivalent of Higgs particles, says Ryo Shimano at the University of Tokyo, who led the team that made the new discovery. The superconductor version explains the virtual mass of light in a superconductor, while the particle physics Higgs field explains the mass of W and Z bosons in the vacuum.

Watch Professor Volkas discussing the fine points of the Higgs boson with ABC News in September 2013. Follow him on Twitter @RVolkas or connect with him on LinkedIn.

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